Search

LATERAL EPICONDYLITIS: "TENNIS ELBOW"

Updated: Aug 15, 2021

Been told you have “Tennis Elbow”? Only to realize you’ve never actually played tennis before?

Well, don’t be confused. It’s just a little thing called LATERAL EPICONDYLALGIA (yeah, she’s a tongue twister!).

*SIDE CHAT: It used to be called Lateral Epicondylitis or Tendinitis, however, these terms suggest an inflammatory process. In recent studies, we now know that the cause of this condition is more degenerative in nature and that the injury occurs as a result of microtrauma from overuse!


This is commonly known as a tendinopathy/overuse condition of the elbow involving the forearm extensors. The onset of this condition is normally quite slow and often work/activity related involving wrist extension or supination/pronation of the forearm.

It’s very common across the board, however it can be slightly higher in occupations such as tradies who use power tools a lot, desk workers at computers or even athletes in sports like cricket, weight-lifting and even perhaps, tennis!


These muscles are located on the outer side of your forearm, originating from your lateral epicondyle (outer elbow) all the way down to your fingers!

These muscles control a lot of the movement from your forearm, wrist and fingers including your grip strength, e.g. extending your wrist on a throttle of a motorbike, using a screw driver/drill/hammer, typing on a keyboard etc.


Most common symptoms can include:

- weakness and pain in grip strength (holding a cup of coffee)

- dull ache or burning pain in the lateral elbow

- intermittent sharp pains with certain activities (holding something, extending the wrist)

- potential inflammation


Some conservative treatment options can be :

- soft tissue work through the forearm

- mobilization through the wrist and elbow

- dry needling/cupping to the forearm extensors

- taping techniques

- TENS, ultrasound

- acupuncture

- exercise prescription


There’s many self-management techniques you can use as well! Prognosis of this condition can be anywhere from a few weeks to a few months if left untreated.

SO! Don’t hesitate! If you suspect you may have some nasty epicondylalgia happening, book in to get an assessment done by your favorite allied health practitioner (or Myo even…) and get started















2 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All